Fleet

Scania light rescue pump

 

Light Rescue Pumps are the newest fire engines in the Service. We have nine of these at on-call fire stations and they look like a normal Scania fire engine but carry more equipment than a standard water tender, making them able to deal with some rescues. They hold 1,800 litres of water and equipment that firefighters use on a day-to-day basis, including hose reels and ladders, to help them deal with the majority of different emergencies. They are generally crewed by five firefighters. These fire engines have CCTV.

Scania rescue pump

 

The Service has six rescue pumps strategically located across the county. These look like a standard Scania fire engine but carry more specialist equipment to deal with rescue. They hold 1,800 litres of water and equipment that firefighters use on a day-to-day basis, including hose reels and ladders, to help them deal with the majority of different emergencies. They are generally crewed by five firefighters. They are located at Cambridge, Dogsthorpe, Huntingdon, St Neots, Ely and Wisbech. These fire engines have CCTV.

Scania water tender

 

This is a standard fire engine and also referred to as an appliance or a pump.  It holds 1,800 litres of water and equipment that firefighters use on a day-to-day basis to help them deal with the majority of different emergencies.  We have two makes of fire engines within the Service - Scania and Dennis.  The equipment on them is the same, they are just a different manufacturer of vehicle (the chassis).  They are generally crewed by five firefighters.

Rescue vehicle

We have three of these stationed at Dogsthorpe, Huntingdon and Cambridge.  They are crewed by two firefighters and, as the name suggests, are called to incidents which require a more complex rescue such as water rescues and animal rescues. They are also sent to road traffic collisions to provide extra support to crews. 

Multistar 1+

 

We currently have two Multistar 1+ , one based at Stanground and one to at Cambridge. The Multistar 1+ is a multi-functional appliance that combines day to day firefighting, rescue and aerial rescue capabilities in one vehicle. It has a 31 metre ladder with a cage on the end to rescue people. The ladder can be extended to a height of 31 metres and can also be extended down below the vehicle as well as up.

Water Carrier (WC)

 

The water carrier is crewed by on-call firefighters at Yaxley where it is housed and it contains 9,000 litres of water.  This is used during incidents such as large fires which require a lot of water.

Incident Command Unit (ICU)

 

The new ICU is a state of the art command and control vehicle, and is sent to incidents for incident commanders to work from to coordinate the firefighting or rescue operations. It contains computers, cameras and a secure satellite connection. It is also equipped with a canopy with an outside smart board for multi-agency briefings. The ICU is based at Huntingdon and is crewed by two firefighters from either the on-call, 5-watch or Tactical Delivery Group.

 

Incident Response Unit (IRU)

 

The IRU is based at St Neots and is a vehicle provided by Communities and Local Government (CLG) for use at Chemical, Biological, Nuclear and Radiological (CBRN) incidents.  It stores gas-tight suits and has other equipment on board such as portable shower units and decontamination tents

High Volume Pump (HVP)

 

Our HVP is housed at Cambourne and is crewed by two on-call firefighters. A crew from another on-call station is sent with the HVP to assist with setting it up. Firefighters at Papworth and Gamlingay are trained to use the HVP. The HVP is used to pump large quantities of water to an incident, or it can be used to move large quantities of water away from an area such as in flood situations. The HVP has been provided by the department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) and is a national resilience asset.

Driver trainer vehicle

 

We have two standard fire engines with L-plates on the front and rear.  Firefighters undertake an intensive in-house training course before they can drive the fire engines.  First they complete a five day Light Goods Vehicle (LGV) basic driving course and are assessed by an affiliated Driving Standards Agency (DSA) examiner.  They must then drive a fire engine for six months or 600 miles on non-emergency journeys.  They can then complete an Emergency Fire Appliance Driver (EFAD) course after which they are assessed and if they pass they can drive a fire engine to emergencies on blue lights.

Officer cars

 

Our fire officers take the role of incident commanders at the scenes of property fires, RTCs and other significant incidents. They have special vehicles that look like civilian cars, but at the press of a button have blue lights and sirens for use when travelling to emergencies. Our new fleet of officer cars are VW Passat and Golf Estates and Golf cars. They use super bright LED technology fitted discretely to the lighting systems on the front and back of the vehicles, which flash when activated, along with sirens to alert the traffic.